17 July 2017

From reimagining physicians training to changing how the legal system deals with Indigenous land claims, the outstanding research of our 2017 Pierre Elliott Trudeau Foundation scholars is crucial, ground-breaking, and already getting noticed. Delve into stories, interviews, and discussions sparked worldwide by their cutting-edge work in the humanities and social sciences. Here is a roundup of stories spanning from British Columbia to Newfoundland and Labrador:

The University of Victoria is home to two Foundation scholars this year. Ryan Tonkinis examining the philosophical and legal justifications for tax proposals aimed at alleviating income inequality in Canada’s democratic, multicultural context. Watch the first Foundation scholar from UVic’s Department of Philosophy discuss his experiences as a student and his commitment to the community. Ryan Beaton wants to change how the legal system deals with Indigenous land claims. He is analyzing the role Canadian courts have played in attempting to reconcile the prior existence of Indigenous societies with assertions of Crown sovereignty. Read more about them in this University of Victoria article.

Not far away, the University of British Columbia proudly spread the word about its two Foundation scholars. While they come from different faculties, both scholarship recipients conduct research relating to the health and wellbeing of Canadians. Stephanie Lake’s research investigates how the medical use and legalization of cannabis might positively impact the ongoing opioid overdose crisis affecting British Columbia and the rest of Canada. Check out her interviews on her department website, the UBC School of Population and Public Health and on the BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS’ newsletter. For his part, Brett Schrewe, a practicing pediatrician and the first Foundation scholar from UBC’s Department of Educational Studies, is drawing upon the history and design of medical education to re-imagine physician training with the goal of realizing the Canada Health Act’s inherent promise of health equity. Read Brett’s interview in the article published by UBC Graduate Studies. Learn more about both students in another article published by UBC.

Milad Parpouchi of Simon Fraser University is investigating the factors that contribute to homelessness and the effectiveness of supported housing models in promoting social inclusion, recovery, and self-determination. In an interview with North Shore News, Milad remarked that the Foundation scholarship “doesn’t just provide financial support, but also provides a whole community of mentors and senior scientists, called Fellows, where we can work together with common goal of advancing social policy in Canada.” Read what SFU News had to say about his work.

The first Foundation scholar from Ryerson University, Vathsala Illesinghe, is analyzing the trajectory of people who have moved from Sri Lanka to Canada to determine how immigration policies affect immigrant and refugee women’s vulnerability to violence. Catch her talking about her work in The Ryerson Today.

Meanwhile, at the University of Toronto, Daniel Del Gobbo is researching the role of alternative dispute resolution in addressing campus sexual violence in Canada. Sarah Mason-Case examines how diverse communities of state and non-state actors, including civil advocates, Indigenous coalitions, and industry, engage in lawmaking practices that define the contours of international climate change law. Read more in the University of Toronto Faculty of Law article.

What do changing notions of masculinity have to do with prospects for peace in the Middle East? That is the question that Emma Swan is exploring at the University of Ottawa. ”One of the points that really attracted me to [the scholarship ] was the mentorship that the foundation provides,” Swan said in an interview at her Faculty of Social Sciences. Also at the University of Ottawa, two doctoral students in law are doing crucial work. While Sophie de Saussure is exploring how courts might better take the interest of offenders’ children into account when determining their sentences, Pierre Cloutier de Repentigny critically analyzes the laws of the sea that protect marine biodiversity with a view to promoting a more sustainable relationship between marine life and humanity. Check out the article about Sophie and Pierre’s research.

Over in Quebec, Université de Montréal celebrated its two Foundation scholars. Benjamin Gagnon Chainey is the first Foundation scholar from UdeM’s Department of Literature. He analyzes the evolution of empathy and the patient-caregiver relationship through literary writings touching on AIDS and medical practices, starting at the end of the 19th century. Read an in-depth interview on his work and background hereElena Waldispuehl is exploring how social media is redefining collective action and how the digital world has affected activists’ personal engagement, online and off. Read more about both in the article published by UdeM News.

Stephanie Roy of Université Laval wants to redefine the obligations of the state towards the environment to reflect ethical guidelines and protect the environment for generations to come. Check out her interview in Le Fil.

Jamie Snookmay be student at the University of Guelph, but he continues to live where he grew up in Labrador. He is researching the relationships between public health and Indigenous co-management of fish and wildlife resources in Labrador’s Inuit communities. “Importantly with this particular scholarship and the foundation is the network of people you get to interact with in that community,” he said in The Telegram. “It gives your research a chance to get more exposure and more well-known so hopefully it will more of an impact that way.” Read his interview interview with the University of Guelph.

Congratulations once again to these inspiring researchers and a huge welcome to our newest Pierre Elliott Trudeau community members!

Missed the 2017 scholar announcement? Catch up with the work of all of our outstanding  scholars online or follow us on Twitter or #PETFscholars for more updates!

Ryan Tonkin

Ryan Tonkin (philosophy, University of Victoria) is examining the philosophical and legal justifications for tax proposals aimed at alleviating income inequality in Canada’s democratic, multicultural context.

2017 Scholars

Ryan Beaton

Ryan Beaton (law, University of Victoria) is examining the role Canadian courts have adopted over the past several decades in trying to reconcile the prior existence of Indigenous societies with assertions of Crown sovereignty.

2017 Scholars

Stephanie Lake

Stephanie Lake (population and public health, University of British Columbia) is investigating how the medical use and legalization of cannabis might help the ongoing opioid overdose crisis affecting British Columbia and the rest of Canada.

2017 Scholars

Brett Schrewe

Brett Schrewe (educational studies, University of British Columbia) is drawing upon the history and design of medical education to re-imagine physician training with the goal of realizing the Canada Health Act’s inherent promise of health equity.

2017 Scholars

Milad Parpouchi

Milad Parpouchi (population and public health, Simon Fraser University) is investigating the factors that contribute to homelessness and the effectiveness of supported housing models in promoting social inclusion, recovery, and self-determination.

2017 Scholars

Vathsala Illesinghe

Vathsala Illesinghe (policy studies, Ryerson University) is analyzing the migration trajectory of people who have moved from Sri Lanka to Canada to determine how immigration policies affect immigrant and refugee women’s vulnerability to violence.

2017 Scholars

Daniel Del Gobbo

Daniel Del Gobbo (law, University of Toronto) is researching the role of alternative dispute resolution in addressing campus sexual violence in Canada.

2017 Scholars

Sarah Mason-Case

Sarah Mason-Case (law and international relations, University of Toronto) examines how diverse communities of state and non-state actors, including civil advocates, Indigenous coalitions, and industry, engage in lawmaking practices that define the contours of international climate change law.

2017 Scholars

Emma Swan

Emma Swan (international development and global studies, University of Ottawa) is exploring the relationship between violence, the construction of male gender identities, and peacebuilding in conflict settings.

2017 Scholars

Sophie de Saussure

Sophie de Saussure (law, University of Ottawa) is exploring how courts might better take the interest of offenders’ children into account when determining offenders’ sentences.

2017 Scholars

Pierre Cloutier de Repentigny

Pierre Cloutier de Repentigny (environmental law, University of Ottawa) critically analyzes rules under the law of the sea that protect marine biodiversity with a view to promoting a more sustainable relationship between marine life and humanity.

2017 Scholars

Benjamin Gagnon Chainey

Benjamin Gagnon Chainey (French-language literature, Université de Montréal and Université Paris 7) analyses the evolution of empathy and the patient-caregiver relationship through literary writings touching on AIDS and medical practices, starting at the end of the 19th century.

2017 Scholars

Elena Waldispuehl

Elena Waldispuehl (political science, Université de Montréal) is exploring how social media is redefining collective action and how the digital world has affected activists’ personal engagement, online and off-line.

2017 Scholars

Stéphanie Roy

Stéphanie Roy (administrative law, Université Laval) wants to redefine the obligations of the state towards the environment to reflect ethical guidelines and protect the environment for generations to come.

2017 Scholars

Jamie Snook

Jamie Snook (Indigenous health, University of Guelph) is researching relationships between public health and Indigenous co-management of fish and wildlife resources in Labrador’s Inuit communities.

2017 Scholars