31 May 2017

Each year, the Canadian Political Science Association awards the Donald Smiley Prize to the best book published in English or French relating to the study of government and politics in Canada. For the 2017 edition of the prize, the jury decided to award two winners instead of the usual one: 2006 fellow John Borrows was recognized for his book Freedom and Indigenous Constitutionalism, while 2010 scholar Erin Tolley won for her book Framed: Media and the Coverage of Race in Canadian Politics.

Excerpt from jury report about John Borrows’s book:
“A moving and impressive book that spans Canadian politics, political thought and legal theory, this work is a wide-ranging and deeply thoughtful consideration of the diverse ways that Indigenous traditions and practices address one of the fundamental questions of politics: how can we live together in ways that enhance freedom and respect?”

Excerpt from jury report about Erin Tolley’s book:
“Offering one of the first sustained studies of the ways in which race is represented in media coverage of Canadian politics, this book offers a much-needed and long overdue response to a significant void in the discipline of Canadian political science.”Offering one of the first sustained studies of the ways in which race is represented in media coverage of Canadian politics, this book offers a much-needed and long overdue response to a significant void in the discipline of Canadian political science

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John Borrows

John Borrows is a leading scholar in the field of indigenous legal traditions and aboriginal rights.

2006 Fellows

Erin Tolley

Erin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Polical Science at the University of Toronto. She completed her doctorate at Queen's University on the relationship between the media and politics in Canada.

2010 Scholars